Dill The Most Important Culinary Herb In Scandinavia

The ancient herb, Anethum graveolens or Fernleaf dill as it is commonly known, was mentioned some 5,000 years ago in early Egyptian writings. It is the most important culinary herb in Scandinavia, as popular as parsley is in other parts of the world. The word ‘dill’ stems from the Old Norse word dilla, meaning “to lull,” and can be grown indoors and out. The feathery leaves make dill a pretty foliage plant, which is lovely as a green foil for the flowers in your garden. The fragrance of dill on fingers evokes a ‘comfort smell’ for many people as the leaves smell of homemade dill pickles. Old-fashioned dill water or gripe water as it is commonly known (made by infusing crushed dill seeds in hot water), is still used as a remedy for indigestion in adults as well as children.

Dill is an annual but self-seeds so once planted you will have it forever in your garden as long as you allow some of the plants to go to seed. Dill has yellow flowers and grows 1 – 4 ft. (30 – 120 cm) tall outdoors. In pots indoors, dill will be less tall. Grow dill from seed and when thinning, use the seedlings you pull up, as they are tender and delicious. Dried dill leaves are known as ‘dill weed.’ If you need dill seed for your fall pickles, plant some dill in mid-July to ensure you have ripening seed.

Cultivation requirements: grows best in deep, well-drained, fertile, sandy loam, likes compost or manure. Dill must be grown in full sun and watered during dry periods. Dill is easily grown from seed and grows well indoors if grown under fluorescent lights. Hang the lights 6 inches (15 cm) from plants and leave on for 14 hours a day. Dill does not transplant well and it needs a deep pot for its long taproots. Pinch out the tops to prevent flowering and seed setting to keep plants growing longer.

In the garden, dill can be planted with cabbages but not near carrots. In the kitchen, use dill for pickles, cabbage, turnips, cauliflower, in butter on fried or grilled fish, sour cream, meats, stews, cream cheese, dips. Use fresh with green beans, potato dishes, cheese, soups, salads, seafood, sauces, and snipped on vegetable dishes. Sprinkle young dill on broiling lamb, pork chops, or steaks during the last 5 minutes of cooking. Seeds can be sprinkled on toast or crackers with salmon that has been mixed with mayonnaise. Seeds and leaves can be used in fish sauces. Zucchini can be sliced thin and saut

Related with Dill The Most Important Culinary Herb In Scandinavia you may also interesting
How To Create Classy Container Gardens With Roses

How To Create Classy Container Gardens With Roses

According to the National Gardening Association, 91 million households participated in some form of do-it-yourself lawn and gardening activity in 2005, spending an average of $387. Over the , read more How To Create Classy Container Gardens With Roses

Simply Simple  Simplicity Lawn Mowers

Simply Simple Simplicity Lawn Mowers

Simplicity lawn mowers are manufactured by Simplicity Inc. and are easy to operate with all the operator comforts. Read all about some of the models , read more Simply Simple Simplicity Lawn Mowers

How To Grow Japanese Red Maple Trees From Seed

How To Grow Japanese Red Maple Trees From Seed

You are welcome to use this article on your website or in your newsletter as long as you reprint it as is, including the contact , read more How To Grow Japanese Red Maple Trees From Seed

Learn About Herb Gardening  Get The Natural Facts

Learn About Herb Gardening Get The Natural Facts

One of the most appealing things anyone will learn about herb gardening is how relaxing and simple growing herbs can be. Discovering all the wonderful, , read more Learn About Herb Gardening Get The Natural Facts

Ideas Gallery

Beautiful Flower Gardens Pinterest

Beautiful Flower Gardens Pinterest
Beautiful Flower Gardens Pinterest

Vintage Cast Iron Garden Chairs

Vintage Cast Iron Garden Chairs
Vintage Cast Iron Garden Chairs

Modern Garden Shed Design

Modern Garden Shed Design
Modern Garden Shed Design